Acne treatment (ages 11 - 13)

             Good Skin Knowledge

Acne

Subtopic: Acne treatments
Age group: 11-13
Time: 45 min

Objective

  • Provide at least two examples of ways acne can be treated
  • State at least two tips for helping acne
  • State that acne can be controlled with treatment
  • Reflect on and react to advice from people who have suffered from acne

Materials

Assessment

  • During the Introduction of New Material, Facilitator will assess students’ curren tknowledge of acne treatment.
  • At the end of the Introduction to New Material, Facilitator will check for questions and clarifications of material.
  • During Independent Practice, Facilitator will walk around to assess whether students are able to accomplish the task or need extra guidance.
  • During Closing, Facilitator will discuss their reflection and reactions to the Acne Advice from Real People.

Opening

3 minutes

1.    Facilitator asks students if they know of any ways to help treat acne (or pimples).
       a. If students don’t know, Facilitator can ask students if they know what not to do if they have pimples. Is there anything they should avoid?
       b. This should be brief.

Introduction to new material

10-15 minutes
Materials: Acne Treatment handout

1.    Facilitator then tells students that today they will be talking about some ways to treat acne. Facilitator can remind students that “acne” is just the official name for what they probably know as pimples or zits.

2.    Facilitator passes out Acne Treatment handout.

3.    Facilitator and students can take turns reading through the handout.

4.    Facilitator checks for questions. Facilitator should also stress that it is important to talk to your parents and see a doctor before making any big decisions about products they will be using on their skin, especially since they may have sensitive skin and/or allergies.

Independent practice

15-20 minutes
Materials: Acne Advice from Real People handout, lined paper, pencils

1.    Facilitator explains that it can be really hard to absorb facts from a handout, so they are now going to read some real advice from people who have suffered from acne.

2.    Facilitator passes out Acne Advice from Real People, lined paper and pencils.

3.    Facilitator tells students that they will read the Acne Advice from Real People.  They should try to read at least 3 quotes (and not just all the short ones). It’s okay if they cannot read the whole thing because after 10-12 minutes, they will write a reaction to the handout and lesson on the lined paper provided. If student finishes early, they can raise their hand for paper. If there is a white board, Facilitator can write questions on the board.
       a. What did they think?
       b. How do they feel after reading some of what people had to say?

4.    Facilitator should walk around and check for questions/assistance.

Closing

10 minutes

Materials: Completed reactions from Acne Advice from Real People handout


1.    After time is up, Facilitator talks to the students about what their thoughts and reactions were from what they learned and read today.

2.    Facilitator can have follow-up questions/discussions such as:
    a. Facilitator can go through each quote and ask which students read that quote and what they thought about it, OR Facilitator can ask students if they would like to share what they thought about any of the quotes they read and wrote about.
      i. “How did it make you feel reading what these people wrote?”
      ii. “Do you think you or others might be able to relate to what some of these people had to say?”
      iii. “Did you find any common thread when reading these people’s advice? Any common tips?”
      iv. “Do you think acne is something within your control? Or is it completely out of your control?”
      v. “Was there anything you didn’t know that you learned today?”

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Program made possible
through a grant from Stiefel, a GSK company.